Hotels | Sightseeing | Customer Service
Welcome to New Orleans For 8 years, we have been the leading provider of New Orleans lodging and hotels. We offer a directory for a complete list of hotels in New Orleans. Each listing offers information such as a general property description, amenities and services, number of rooms, prices, special deals and contact information.

The New Orleans hotel room search allows you to check for hotels that have availability for your selected dates. You can narrow your search by choosing desired amenities and services. All of our hotels have been inspected and approved by AAA and the Mobil Travel Guide, the authorities in hotel and restaurant inspection.
Geographer Pierce Lewis once described New Orleans as an “inevitable city on an impossible site.” Its location at the mouth of the Mississippi River made Nouvelle-Orléans one of the most vital ports in North America—and one of the most vulnerable. Built on a dry patch of swamp between the river and Lake Pontchartrain, the Crescent City survived floods and disasters from its earliest days. The first recorded hurricane struck in 1772...
More about
About New Orleans

Geographer Pierce Lewis once described New Orleans as an “inevitable city on an impossible site.” Its location at the mouth of the Mississippi River made Nouvelle-Orléans one of the most vital ports in North America—and one of the most vulnerable. Built on a dry patch of swamp between the river and Lake Pontchartrain, the Crescent City survived floods and disasters from its earliest days. The first recorded hurricane struck in 1772. Not one but two great fires leveled the French Quarter in the 1800s. Yellow fever killed more than 41,000 citizens over the next century. During catastrophic storms in 1947 and 1965, water reached the rooftops. But still the city endured.

Famous for its Mardi Gras revelry and Cajun hospitality, New Orleans became the fifth largest convention destination in the United States, attracting 10 million visitors a year. The Big Easy’s nickname and unofficial motto, Laissez les bons temps rouler (“Let the good times roll”), seemed to belie any serious issue with unemployment, poverty or crime; even the political scandals were entertaining. Then Hurricane Katrina hit on Aug. 29, 2005. Lying 6 feet below sea level, New Orleans counted on a complex system of levees, drainage canals and pumps to keep it dry. The system failed, leaving nearly 80 percent of the city under water. The desperate plight of survivors—and the slow emergency response—shocked the world.

The story of New Orleans’ recovery will take decades to tell. With half a million residents displaced, the metro area may never regain its former numbers. An ambitious rebuilding plan is still in the blueprint stages. Tourism remains the city’s lifeblood, and New Orleans will depend upon new visitors for its survival. Travelers who stay in the French Quarter, high ground in the original settlement, may notice few permanent scars, while those who venture into the outer districts—Lakeview, Gentilly, the ravaged Ninth Ward—will see something akin to a war zone. Employees are in short supply, but newly refurbished hotels and restaurants are back in business. Such favorite attractions as the Audubon Zoo, the National World War II Museum and the New Orleans Museum of Art have already reopened, and mass is being held again in St. Louis Cathedral. Disaster tours are outselling haunted history. The party never ends on Bourbon Street, where construction crews spend their paychecks like sailors on shore leave, and tourists line up at Pat O’Brien’s for a fruity rum concoction known as the Hurricane.

The traditional jazz funeral, unique to New Orleans, seems an apt symbol for this city. Where else would a brass band march in a funeral procession, playing solemn dirges before launching into a raucous version of “When the Saints Go Marching In,” a celebration of life after death?